FastRawViewer Developers Blog

FastRawViewer 2.0.9 Beta

FastRawViewer 2.0.8 Beta

This is a rolling update with new camera/new raw format support, bugfixes, and some features added

Camera/RAW format support

  • Nikon HE/HE* compression support (for Nikon Z8, Z9, Zf cameras)
  • OM System 14-bit files (OM-1 Mark II HighRes/PixelShift shots)
  • 4-channel/bayer JPEG-compressed DNG files

Camera support

  • Fujifilm X-T50, GFX 100S II
  • Panasonic DC-S9 (Preliminary support)
  • Sony UMC-R10C

FastRawViewer 2.0.8 Release

FastRawViewer 2.0.8

Camera support

  • Canon EOS R100, EOS R5C
  • DJI Air 3
  • Fujifilm GFX100-II, X100VI
  • GoPro HERO12
  • Hasselblad CFV-100c, CFV-50c
  • Nikon Z f (standard/lossless compression only)
  • Olympus TG-7, OM-1 Mark II (tested with standard resolution files only)
  • Panasonic DC-ZS200D / ZS220D, DC-TZ200D / TZ202D / TZ220D, G9 Mark II
  • Pentax K III Monochrome, KF
  • Sony ILCE-6700, A7C-II, A7CR, ILX-LR1, A9-III
  • Better handling of PhaseOne files

FastRawViewer 1.7.8 Release

FastRawViewer 1.7.8

FastRawViewer 1.7.8 is released and available from download page.

Camera Support

  • Canon CR3 film roll and raw burst files (only 1st frame from the image sequence is displayed).

Other release notes

This is the last release of FastRawViewer Version 1.

RawPreviewExtractor Beta 0.3

RawPreviewExtractor 0.2 Beta

The program RawPreviewExtractor is intended to extract the JPEG previews contained in RAW files:

  • All RAW formats that have JPEG previews are supported.
  • The preview is extracted “as-is”: same image size
  • It is possible to copy EXIF data from original RAW to the destination JPEG.
  • Only JPEG previews are extracted; other formats (Bitmap, HEIC) are not supported.

FastRawViewer 2 Release

Briefly: What’s New in Version 2

FastRawViewer 2.0

FastRawViewer 2.0 adds the following features (each described in more detail in corresponding sections):

  1. Multi-window Display Mode with synchronous zoom, pan, focus peaking, over/underexposure highlighting, and the ability to copy the rendering parameters of RAW files
  2. Renaming files: either single files or groups, with optional use of templates.
  3. Improved performance, especially when using fast and slow data media at the same time.
  4. Improved user interface: Advanced Selection Mode improvements; Move from _Rejected; and more.

How to Work with Image Archives the FastRawViewer Way

Working with archives

How often do you want to visually browse your substantial archive of a huge collection of RAW files you've compiled over the years, in order to do some "thematic selection"? Or do you happen to have several folders of shots from some event, place, period of time (vacation), person, pet, etc., and you want to pick some shots out?

After you've selected all those photos you need either to copy them into a separate dedicated folder (for a further classification or processing), or onto a memory card (to give them to somebody), or you might want first add or edit ratings and labels, or simply send them to a raw converter for processing and then save the results into designated locations.

We decided to capitalize on the fast rendering FastRawViewer provides and implemented a lightweight but pretty powerful approach.

FastRawViewer 1.7: New View Mode, "without Beautifications"

By default when displaying RAW FastRawViewer applies S-shaped tone curve and Adobe compatible' midtone correction.

With these (default) settings, the RAW display becomes more or less "as expected", correlating to the embedded JPEG and standard Adobe rendition (with all sliders in default positions) in both contrast and brightness.

In FastRawViewer 1.7 we've implemented a quick way to turn of both of these settings and switch between a flat, non-contrasty look, which corresponds to what the camera records into the RAW much more accurately, and a regular view.

FastRawViewer_1-7. Linear View Mode on/off

The Unbearable Lightness of Mystic "Exposure" Triangle

We should begin by saying that the point of all of this is not just to criticize one of the most repeated photographic myths out there – that's just a tool, because an incorrect understanding of the way that exposure and ISO work, as well as their roles during the shooting process, leads to a falloff in the quality of shots that photographers get.

So our goal is to show how, by rejecting this myth, you (the now-enlightened user) will be able to more fully utilize the capabilities that your camera has, as well as to improve the quality of your photographs.

Barnum Quote vs Exposure Triangle

Red Flowers Photography: Now It is Easy to See the Real Picture

Some time ago, we published a couple of articles ("Red Flowers Photography: Real Problems or Deceptive Previews?" and "Forcing a Raw Converter to Render Tones Accurately") demonstrating a multi-step procedure that allows one to prevent Adobe raw converters from showing false highlight clipping.

Now, with the settings that allow one to cancel the baseline exposure compensation and support Highly Linear Mode that are being introduced in FastRawViewer 1.5.2, this process has become much more automated.

FastRawViewer. Grid View. Red Flowers

ISO is Seldom just a Digital Gain

RawDigger. Raw histogram. Digital ISO 25600

Some say, "exactly like dragging exposure slider in Lightroom, ISO ... is just digital gain". With a few exceptions, this is less than a half-truth.

Though it is often the case that at higher ISO settings digital "gain" is applied (or a converter, using a metadata tag, is instructed to apply it), analog gain still acts first, before "digital gain" (the better word would be "multiplication", not gain, as in electronics "gain" most often pertains to analog domain).

The giveaway for multiplication is deep and regular gaps in the raw histogram that become wider with each increase of ISO setting.

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